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Give Me Your Top 10 QBs For This Year

Discussion in 'NFL Football Forum' started by FaCe-LeE-uS, Jul 2, 2018.

  1. Across The Field

    Across The Field THEE Authoritay

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    In what way was Dak better? Zeke was the highest rated offensive rookie in the NFL by a wide margin that year. Did you know he had nearly 1,000 yards rushing after contact? Dak had a nice season, but without Zeke, he would've been an afterthought. Zeke was clearly the catalyst for that offense. He led the league in rushing by a huge mark, yet Dak led the league in nothing.
     



  2. jarntt

    jarntt Well-Known Member

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    I don't need you to tell me about Zeke's year. Come on now, don't be silly. I'm also not going round and round with you. Dak had an historically great rookie year, not just a good year. Zeke also had a great rookie year, but Dak was just better. I'm quite confident I watched more Cowboy games than you. I'm quite confident i watched more games twice than you watched once. I don't make up my mind on what the stats are in the paper, I do so on what i see with my eyes. I'm not going to argue Zeke wasn't good. You've made up your mind on Dak and I don't really care to argue about it since your mind is indeed made up. I go back and forth to debate or explain my opinion, but not when there is no point to it - doesn't mean I'm right but I'm just wasting time discussing it. You may be right or wrong in the long run, but you are 100% wrong about how good he was in year one.
     
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  3. jarntt

    jarntt Well-Known Member

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    Just re-read this. Meant for the bolded to come off as factual and just giving my stance on discussing vs no longer discussing. Wasn't trying to come off as a dick or lecturing you or saying I'm right and you're wrong. Just comes a point where we are both just wasting our breadth because we both believe what we believe. Oh and Cleveland sucks:heh:
     
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  4. Across The Field

    Across The Field THEE Authoritay

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    :slaphappy:


    Well actually, you're right there.
     
  5. jarntt

    jarntt Well-Known Member

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    More proof that Wentz sucks:


    Madden releases its top five quarterbacks for 2019
    Posted by Mike Florio on July 9, 2018, 4:37 PM EDT
    [​IMG]
    Getty Images

    Listing the top five or ten NFL quarterbacks never has been an easy thing to do. Every year, the folks at EA have no choice but to try.

    They’ve officially announced the five highest-rating quarterbacks for the 2019 edition of the Madden game. And while the same top five who were previously disclosed are indeed the final top five, the list is slightly different.

    As reported last month, the top five were Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (99), Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (97), Saints quarterback Drew Brees (90), Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson (89), and Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan (88). The actual fiveconsists of Rodgers and Brady at 99, Wilson at 92, Brees at 91, and Ryan at 89.
     
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  6. PhoenixEagles1

    PhoenixEagles1 Well-Known Member

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    Nah... military does nothing for your career. Its just an avenue for working class kids who dont want to go or cant get into college. I appreciate the fact that we need a military but its nothing I'd let my kids do with the PTSD, anxiety and the tragic suicide rate. Its not like the smart kids in HS choose the military. I apologize if I offended you but I'm not very high on the military.
     
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  7. FaCe-LeE-uS

    FaCe-LeE-uS How's Business?

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    According to Madden 19 the top 10 is:

    1. Rodgers - 99
    2. Brady - 99
    3. Wilson - 92
    4. Brees - 91
    5. Ryan - 89
    T-6. Ben - 86
    T-6. Rivers - 86
    T-6. Luck - 86
    9. Wentz - 85
    10. Stafford - 83
     
  8. Manster7588

    Manster7588 Full Time Asshole.

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    Just when I thought you couldn't be any dumber, you drop this gem.
     
  9. PhoenixEagles1

    PhoenixEagles1 Well-Known Member

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    Whats dumb about it? Do smart kids got to the military? No. Do wealthy kids go to the military? No. Its an avenue for working class kids. Here comes the stories about the valedictorians choosing the military.... yawn
     
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  10. handicappers

    handicappers GoldenSpur wears his sissy panties every day

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    You are truly an imbecile. So no smart, wealthy kids go to the military academies?

    Derpa Derp
     
  11. PhoenixEagles1

    PhoenixEagles1 Well-Known Member

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    Never said that. Im talking statistically. The majority of people that go in the military are working class kids with limited options.
     
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  12. handicappers

    handicappers GoldenSpur wears his sissy panties every day

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    Derp
     
  13. Montalban

    Montalban Well-Known Member

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    Brady
    Garopollo
    Rodgers
    Ryan
    Brees
    Wilson

    You can have the rest of them
     
  14. PhoenixEagles1

    PhoenixEagles1 Well-Known Member

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    Do you know what people mean by usually. Hyper analyzing posts and holding them accountable is beyond ridiculous man. Its like if I said, "Zeke is a great RB" and you saying, "He only had 7 yards against the Broncos, is that what you consider great"

    The military is needed. I respect people who make the sacrifice. People from all classes, races and walks of life have joined the military. But USUALLY and most often its working class kids with limited options.
     
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  15. handicappers

    handicappers GoldenSpur wears his sissy panties every day

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    Got any proof of that? You're USUALLY a fucking idiot.
     
  16. PhoenixEagles1

    PhoenixEagles1 Well-Known Member

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    Poor and Uneducated, Like We Thought

    Curious about anything that challenges my assumptions, I looked into the Heritage Foundation study. As it turns out, military personnel are poorer and less educated than the average American civilian. Moreover, they're also a lot more likely to be African-American. (State-controlled media continues to repeat Heritage's claim that the military reflects American racial demographics.)

    There are lies, damned lies and Republican statistics. The Heritage study relies on apples-to-oranges comparisons and factual omissions.

    No one tracks how much soldiers earned the year before they enlist. The Department of Defense estimates that its employees take a $20,000-per-year pay-and-benefits hit relative to civilians the same age throughout their careers. There is, however, a nifty study by the nonpartisan National Priorities Project that compares home ZIP codes of new recruits to tax return data for those areas. "Neighborhoods with low- to middle-median household incomes are over-represented," finds the NPP. "Neighborhoods with high-median household incomes are under-represented."

    A closer look shows that the socioeconomic distance between America at home and American troops abroad is a gaping chasm. Young men and women from affluent neighborhoods—those with average household incomes of $100,000 or more—are three to four times less likely as those from poor and lower middle class areas (under $50,000) to serve in the military. This ratio is increasing.

    Heritage obtained different results by "comparing these wartime recruits (2003–2005) to the resident population ages 18–24" in each ZIP code (as opposed to the overall population, all ages included). Many recruits are college dropouts who list their last address—their college dorm—when they sign up. College ZIP codes are populated by disproportionately high numbers of 18 to 24-year-olds who are full-time students and/or work low-paying and part-time jobs. Though imperfect, NPP gets much closer to comparing apples to apples by looking at the overall income picture of recruits' hometowns or communities surrounding a college, not just college-aid kids who earn a pittance.

    Nothing says that poor people can't make good soldiers. But let's not kid ourselves. There's a reason so many of the dead come from high-unemployment, low-wage states like West Virginia. They're desperate. And desperate people are more tempted to accept a job that could cost them their lives.

    "Many enlisted personnel are drawn to the benefits offered by the armed forces that allow them to obtain funding for college," the Heritage study's authors allow. On the broader point of education levels among U.S. troops, however, they again resort to pomegranate-to-rutabaga comparisons.

    The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office's "1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel" (the last year for which such data is available) found that "about 60 percent of enlisted personnel surveyed ... reported having no more than a high-school-level education when they began their military service." (Heritage jacks up the total to 83 percent by including GEDs.) Ninety percent of employed Americans over age 25 have a high school diploma.

    As they age, military personnel eventually obtain additional educational credentials during their years in the service. Even so, the March 2003 U.S. Census finds that 32 percent of employed Americans have a bachelor's or advanced degree. Just 7 percent of soldiers do.

    You don't need a Ph.D. in Middle East Studies to fire a rifle. But higher education generally leads to greater worldliness—which would come in handy in the post-9/11 era.

    "Allegations that recruiters are disproportionately targeting blacks also don't hold water," says the Heritage Foundation. "First, whites make up 77.4 percent of the nation's population and 75.8 percent of its military volunteers, according to our analysis of Department of Defense data."

    Which is "true"—but not True.

    The key word here is "volunteers," which here means "new recruits." A new CBO study released this July states: "Because black personnel have been a larger share of recruits in the past and because they have relatively high retention rates, however, they account for a larger share of the active enlisted force as a whole: 19 percent, compared with 14 percent of the civilian population of 17- to 49-year-olds. Black service members make up a smaller percentage of the active officer corps: 9 percent."

    You're more than 35 percent more likely to be in the military if you're black than if you're white. But you're 35 percent less likely to become an officer. Ignore the propaganda—the military is a reflection of, rather than a cure for, racism.

    "Recruiters are knowingly allowing neo-Nazis and white supremacists to join the armed forces, and commanders don't remove them from the military even after we positively identify them as extremists or gang members," Scott Barfield, a Defense Department investigator, told the Southern Poverty Law Center.

    There are, of course, intelligent, well-educated children of wealthy parents serving in the military. But they are the exception, not the rule. If Afghanistan and Iraq are, as the Bush administration argues, central fronts in the war on terror, which is a war for hearts and minds, we ought to be sending our best-prepared, most presentable representatives of American society abroad as personal ambassadors. Our decision not to pay the higher salaries and benefits that would lure those men and women out of the civilian workforce belies those claims.
     
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  17. handicappers

    handicappers GoldenSpur wears his sissy panties every day

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    According to a comprehensive study of all enlistees for the years 2002-2015 that The Heritage Foundation just released, the typical recruit in the all-volunteer force is wealthier, more educated and more rural than the average 18- to 24-year-old citizen is. Indeed, for every two recruits coming from the poorest neighborhoods, there are three recruits coming from the richest neighborhoods.

    If, for example, we consider the education of every recruit, 98% joined with high-school diplomas or better. By comparison, 75% of the general population meets that standard. Among all three-digit ZIP code areas in the USA in 2003 (one can study larger areas by isolating just the first three digits of ZIP codes), not one had a higher graduation rate among civilians than among its recruits.

    In fact, since the 9/11 attacks, more volunteers have emerged from the middle and upper classes and fewer from the lowest-income groups. In 1999, both the highest fifth of the nation in income and the lowest fifth were slightly underrepresented among military volunteers. Since 2001, enlistments have increased in the top two-fifths of income levels but have decreased among the lowest fifth.
     
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  18. Manster7588

    Manster7588 Full Time Asshole.

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    The military is more educated than the people they protect.
     
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  19. FaCe-LeE-uS

    FaCe-LeE-uS How's Business?

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    Holy crap this thread got derailed... Can you guys take that shit to the PF please?
     
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  20. PhoenixEagles1

    PhoenixEagles1 Well-Known Member

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    Where do you come up with that. There’s a lot of people that don’t have a HS diploma and the military requires a HS diploma but a HS diploma isn’t typically considered educated. Is that what you’re using as your basis for more educated? I mean this is common knowledge. How many people go to Harvard and transition to the military? Kids who do well in HS go to college. Kids that don’t fall back on the military. We need a military and I respect people who put their life on the line for our protection but it is what it is. Mainly rural working class kids.
     
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